Immigration (Recommendations)

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Providing asylum to the persecuted is a vital and treasured part of the American humanitarian tradition. It deserves reaffirmation and continued commitment. The asylum process, however, can also become a misused exception in the nation’s immigration laws, especially in a time of improved transcontinental travel and communications. Two important...

United States consulates around the world complete the processing of some nine million applications for immigrant and nonimmigrant visas each year. Approximately ninety percent are granted; ten percent are denied. Under current practice, the only review of a consular official’s denial of a visa may be by a more senior officer in the consulate, or,...

The Immigration and Nationality Act of 1952, as amended, requires the Justice Department to make two major types of decisions affecting alienswhether to exclude aliens seeking to enter the United States and whether to deport those already in the country. The Act and the accompanying regulations...

A substantial number of individuals involved in Federal “mass justice”1 agency proceedings need and desire assistance2 in filling out forms, filing claims, and appearing in agency proceedings,...

Recommendation 2012-3, “Immigration Removal Adjudication,” addresses the problem of case backlogs in immigration removals. The recommendation suggests a number of ways to enhance efficiency and fairness in these cases. Officials from the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the Department of Justice's Executive Office for Immigration Review (EOIR) had significant and helpful input during...

Under the 1965 amendments to the Immigration and Nationality Act aliens seeking permanent residence for the purpose of employment must obtain a certification from the Secretary of Labor that, in essence, there are no suitable workers available in the United States and that their employment will not adversely affect wages and working conditions. 8 U.S.C. 1182(a)(14). The...

  • Recommendation number: 71-5
  • Adopted on: December 6, 1971
  • Tags: Immigration

Section 245 of the Immigration and Nationality Act, 8 U.S.C. § 1255 (1970), provides that an alien who meets all requirements for admission as an immigrant may have his status adjusted “by the Attorney General, in his discretion and under such regulations as he may prescribe, to that of an alien lawfully admitted for permanent residence.”

The...

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